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AlexGuofengCao.com

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By HANNAH SAMPSON
Published: December 2, 2010

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20101210MiamiHerald Art Review
Art Basel draws a crowd, and hotels are selling out
HOTELS SELLING OUT AT TOP PRICE TO ART PATRONS

During last year's recession-tinged Art Basel Miami Beach, gallery art director Christine Schefman scored a great deal -- on a $199-a-night room at the Fontainebleau. This year, the bargains were harder to come by, but Schefman was still pleased with the rooms she found a few months ago at the nearby Eden Roc for a little over $200 a night. ``I think we spent a fair price,'' said Schefman, of David Klein Gallery near Detroit, which is showing at the satellite Art Miami fair. ``Have you tried to get a hotel in New York lately? That's insane.'' Schefman's experience sums up the hotel scene for Art Basel and its surrounding events this year: Prices are higher, rooms sold out faster and discounts are scarcer, but the stratospheric rates that angered exhibitors before the economic downturn appear to have disappeared. Still, hotels reported that they were happily charging full price and in some cases requiring three- or four-night minimum stays. ``I can tell you that every single room in the hotel is sold at its full price,'' said George M. Cozonis, general manager of the W South Beach Hotel & Residences. The hotel has been sold out since September at prices ranging from $850 studios to $8,500 penthouse suites with a minimum four-night stay for most rooms. By contrast, Cozonis said, last year the 408-unit hotel still had rooms available in mid-November for the December art week.
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By FABIOLA SANTIAGO
Published: December 4, 2009

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You don't have to be a connoisseur or recite art history to revel in the annual art invasion otherwise known as Art Basel Miami Beach and its surrounding 19 satellite art fairs.


Simply put, we live in an artful and art-full paradise.


It may sound corny, but at its best, art inspires, provokes, educates, surprises, shocks and delights. So put on some comfortable walking shoes and revel in the images.


Here's a Miami Herald staff selection of don't-miss works to help you navigate the mayhem of too many shows, too little time:


At ChinaSquare Gallery in Art Miami, pixelated images by Alex Guofeng Cao appear to be huge photographs. But look closely and you'll see that the "pixels" are really tiny photographic images. The portrait of President Barack Obama is made up of photos of President Abraham Lincoln; Marilyn Monroe is composed of tiny images of JFK; JFK of tiny images of Monroe. Sold opening night: An image of Carla Bruni, made up of tiny images of French President Nicolas Sarkozy.


 
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Published: January 28, 2011
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20110128LAtimes
Art Review

Los Angeles is primed: Art fair, please step up
 

Many in the art community believe the city could sustain a major fair. Shows lined up for the year, including this weekend's Art Los Angeles Contemporary and a new one in September, aim to make it happen.

 
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Published: April 13, 2012
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20120413DallasNews Art Review

2012 Dallas Art Fair kicks off with a pre-party.
See what you missed


Christie Reniger and Beth Ewing, right, react to art by Alex Guofengcao during a pre-party to kick off the Dallas Art Fair, on April 12, 2012 at the Fashion Industry Gallery in Downtown Dallas. The work of art consists of thousands of tiny images to form an overall portrait of John F. Kennedy and Marilyn Monroe.

 
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Published: April 13, 2012
By Jamie Laughlin

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20120412DallasObserver Art Review

NSFW: Last Night's Dallas Art Fair Gala, With 19th Century Muff Shots  

New York artist Alex Guofeng Cao's room was so popular that it lured people into one of the bottom floor's distant corners, an impressive feat. (If it were IKEA, he would be in "Lighting.") This toast of Art Basel's current project is a fun play on pop icon photography, where famous black and white pictures of celebrities are reconstructed out of tinier images. The miniature photos can be examined with the naked eye but also with magnifying glasses, which hang next to most prints.

As you walk in you're greeted by a very large, mostly naked Pamela Anderson. Her hand is gripping her hair in that "over it" kind of way, and her boobs are so robust you worry they might slap you. Upon closer inspection you see that this piece is called "Pamela vs. Courbet," meaning that Pamela's photographic cells are made out of repeating images by Gustave Courbet, the 19th century French Realist painter. The piece Cao chose? "The Origin Of The World," Courbet's up-close muff shot.

If you haven't bought a pass for the Dallas Art Fair, you must. And make your phone's default Safari page ArtBabble, because it's fun to research and learn while you explore. Also, wear comfy shoes or put some Dr. Scholl's in those adorable platforms because every space in town has an opening party this weekend and you'll be doing some running. My advice is do Dallas Art Fair each afternoon, then local openings at night. I'll put up a list of 'em later this afternoon.

 

 
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Published: April 16, 2012
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20120416ArtSeek Art Review

Materials Mystify at Dallas Art Fair


And what about  the Audrey Hepburn photograph divided into hundreds of photographic pixels of Marlene Dietrich? When arriving in the U.S. from China, photographer Alex Guofeng Cao of Art Space Gallery fixated on what he saw as important to Americans: celebrities, politics, patriotism and sex. He blew up our foibles and obsessions, as if to say “in your face, America,” with not just one face, but with thousands of mini faces. The gallery offers magnifying glasses and take-away mints in miniature pixel boxes with the reproduced photos as calling cards. Perhaps the mints are to wash away the bad taste of America’s bad taste.

 
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Published: May 1, 2012
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20120501ChicagoSunTimes Art Review

Let’s appreciate the big art show that isn’t there


The show covers three floors of the Mart. Becky Vu studies the Photo Mosaics of artist Alex Guofeng Cao. Repetitive tiny images in graged shades compose the recognizable image. The larger photo is not composed of like images though. Example-Marilyn Monroe is made up of tiny graded images of the Mona Lisa.

 
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By JOSHUA B. GRAY
Published: August 5, 2010

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20100805TheInquirerMirrornp2 Art Review

Pixel Perfect American Icons at Cavalier Gallery

Reprinted from the Aug. 5, 2010 | Nantucket Inquirer and Mirror (www.ack.net)

By Joshua B. Gray
I&M Staff Writer

Inspired by one of the oldest art forms known to man, photographer Alex Guofeng Cao has created mosaics for the modern age.

Cavalier Galleries on Main Street will open a month-long exhibition this evening showing his large-scale digital images in a show called “Icon vs. Iconic.”


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Published: December 10, 2010


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John Lennon's son Julian Lennon chacks out a print of his father by artist Alex Guofeng Cao from New York's ChinaSquare Gallery during Art Miami. Courtesy of ChinaSquare Gallery.

 
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Published: February 25, 2011


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20110225naplesnews
Art Review

Marco Island resident Kathy O'Brien, from right, and her friend, Naples resident Terry Kalten, use a magnifying glass to view tiny images that compose a larger image called "Gisele vs. Brady, After Penn" inside the Cavalier Galleries, Inc. booth during opening night of the Naples International Art & Antiques Fair at the Naples International Pavilion on Thursday night. The image, a large black and white photo of Gisele Bundchen taken by photographer Irving Penn, is made up of tiny images of Tom Brady, and was recreated by artist Alex Guofeng Cao. Hundreds of people attended the event where about 40 vendors displayed items such as Renoir paintings, a signed photograph of Abe Lincoln - his first taken as President of the United States. The event is a fundraiser for the Naples Philharmonic Center for the Arts. Lexey Swall/Staff

 
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Published: February 28, 2011


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20110228BostonHerald Art Review

We Hear: Paula Abdul, Stephanie Hersh, Bridget Moynahan and more...

That a star attraction at the Naples International Art and Antiques Fair in Florida the other night was a work of art called “Gisele vs. Brady, After Penn.” The piece, by artist Alex Guofeng Cao, was based on a photograph of the Brazilian supermodel by Arthur Penn that Cao re-created using teeny-tiny images of her hubby, Tom Brady.

 
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Published: January 1, 2011


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20110111EyesIn Art Review

Eyes in Photography – New York – Photographer Alex Guofeng Cao



ALEX GUOFENG CAO at ART MIAMI
For a second year in a row, Alex Guofeng Cao's stunning "pixel perfect" photographic works are generating buzz and excitement at Art Miami! Alex's JFK vs JACKIE (2010) is prominently featured on the front page of the December 1st edition of the Miami Herald's Business section. This follows up last year's Miami Herald front-page cover story declaring Alex as the "Must See" artist of Miami Art Basel 2009.



Additionally, Alex is the first "stand out" mentioned in Art Daily's article on Art Miami's Opening Night VIP Preview, emphasizing "rapid sales" of his artwork. Alex's MY ALL-STARS series is proving to be a huge hit in Miami!

Alex Guofeng Cao came to New York searching for his pursuit, came upon photography, which easily became his passion. Inspired by such masters as Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Edward Weston, and Robert Mapplethorpe, Cao ceaselessly studied and experimented with all methods and techniques in photography. While adept with color, Cao’s preferred medium is the black and white image. Cao’s deep fascination with the subtle gradations of tone between the deep black and the stark white are the generators for all the colors he needs to create his world.

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By KEN JOHNSON
Published: August, 2010

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20100810Mmagazine Art Review

"This is the most comprehensive and thorough guide to New York's art world and galleries I have ever come across. It's all you'll ever need if you are interested in discovering great art in New York."

 

 
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Published: August 10, 2010
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In the 80's, surrounded by glitz, glam and pop, America welcomed amongst many a young teen. Alex arrived with his family from China like so many before to hit New York City. Cao, an "X" er with a distinguished and developing passion for how we look and see ourselves, set his studies on photography. Influenced by his new surroundings in New York, along with the imagery of Irving Penn, Mapplethorpe and other luminaries of the medium, Cao's commercial opportunities gave rise to his fine art. These have stemmed from Vogue to Maxim magazines eliciting further foundation for an explosive and thoughtfully compelling body of work.

In late 2009, Alex Guefeng Cao's Miami Art Basel debut garnered national media attention because of, amongst many reasons, his pixelated photograph series. Each paired "homage" with conceptual insight.

The current collection reaches into the history of pop culture, politics and religion. As many great artist prior, the level of homage to influence - fine art's way of referencing the source - is the latch, the hook that Cao's work visually speaks. He draws on the great societies before our own, relying on "western antiquity" and "...the iconic and statuesque sculptures of the ancient Egypt, Greek and Roman eras." Like his subjects, the photographs remind us of the importance of the image and how it has been built. His detailed and deliberate process (an image within an image) is contrasted with the largest of scale.

Cao's current choice of black and white photography is paired with his love for the mosaic process. All the color that is needed for his art is the various shades of grey, the digital stitching of black and white tiles. Each takes life from the storied, colorful characters and messages a collector ultimately sees.

 
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Published:Summer 2010
By CRAIG STEPHENS

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Artist Alex Guofeng Cao's innovative mosaic-styled art works are resonating on a global scale. Inspired by such masters as Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Edward Weston, and Robert Mapplethorpe, Cao's career as an artist has seen him study and experiment with a variety of photographic methods and techniques.

Of late his photographic creativity has leaned towards large-scale monochromatic digital works, namely a series called "Legend." Explaining the cryptic imagery, Cao reveals, "I'm fascinated by icons and celebrity. I have worked with many from Lindsay Lohan to Tommy Lee Jones, they shared a common musicality that translates internationally."

The "Legend" series sees a melding of two contrasting artistic techniques. Images of pop culture icons, Pam Anderson, Marilyn Monroe, Lady Di, are reinvented and reinterpreted care of Cao's dexterous hand and creative vision.

Technically, Cao says that despite his fascination with the digital medium, monochrome tradition is something he still romanticizes, "The subtle gradations of tone between deep black and stark white are the generators for all the colors I need to create my world."


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Published: May 3, 2010
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20100503ArtAmerica2 Art Review
Art Chicago celebrated its 30th anniversary (April 29–May 3) by hosting 150 galleries exhibiting modern and contemporary art from 55 cities around the world. Power players like Rhona Hoffman Gallery, White Cube, Haunch of Venison, Pace Prints, and Nyehaus brought major works, while non-profit arts organizations, such as amfAR and the Aperture Foundation showed limited edition prints by emerging and established photographers. Special exhibitions highlighted artists exploring social and political ideas, works that are emblematic of major movements and developments in American art, and large-scale sculptures in the interior and exterior public spaces of the Merchandise Mart. The Midwest, show us your malls!
 
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By MARY LEE PAPPAS
Published: May 23, 2010

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20100521Indystar Art Review
Exhibit at Lurie as simple as black and white

Take a look at the black-and-white image of James Dean. Notice anything? Advertisement Now look again. At first glance, the 6-by-9-foot photograph of the iconic actor, a native of Grant County, appears blurry or pixilated. But if you take a closer look, you'll see that the picture is actually made up of thousands of tiny images of Elvis Presley. It's the creative process used by New York-based artist Alex Guofeng Cao, whose works will be on display in "Contrasts and Collusions: A View into The Methodology of Black and White." The exhibit, which opens Friday at the Evan Lurie Fine Art Gallery in Carmel, also features large-scale charcoal-based works by artist Joseph Piccillo. "I'm very proud to have the opportunity . . . to show these two guys," said Evan Lurie, owner of the gallery. "It's stunning work to be seen." The artists, who have earned international acclaim, use monochromatic palettes to convey equally distinct ideas in their art. Cao assembles readily recognizable portraits of iconic Americans using thousands of minute images of a contrasting personality. Ripe with irony, each piece contains a secret code beyond the visual appeal. Piccillo, who exhibited at the Indianapolis Museum of Art in 1984, creates detailed images of stark white horses set against deep black backgrounds. They have a mystical and masculine quality, Lurie said. "I find it very interesting when artists work in black and white," Lurie said, explaining his reason for choosing to pair Cao and Piccillo. The fact that the color scheme has a 500-Mile Race theme was pure coincidence. "It's an accident, but a good one," Lurie said. The gallery owner has admired Piccillo's work for years, but met Cao only last fall at Art Basel in Miami, an art showcase featuring top galleries, special exhibitions, music, film, architecture and design. Lurie said he was fascinated by how the artist's images contrasted within themselves. Cao created special Indiana-themed pieces for this show. Along with Dean, John Dillinger and Abraham Lincoln are featured. The Lincoln image is made up of thousands of tiny President Barack Obama photos.
 
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Published: April 22, 2010
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20100427zoom Art Review
Alex Guofeng Cao is a Chinese artist who ran into the art of photography in New York, the city where he lives. He fell helplessly in love, especially after having seen the works of Irving Penn, Richard Avedon, Edward Weston and Robert Mapplethorpe, who, above all, were his inspiration. His most recent work consists of a gallery of images portraying famous modern and contemporary people. They are Cyclopean photographs that take up an entire wall. It is impossible not to be sucked in by them. But we immediately sense that they are not normal portraits. In fact, from close up, getting a better look at the “raw material” used to create the individuals, we note that the faces have been composed by putting together hundreds of small, virtually identical photographs. Succinctly put, Cao’s are ingenious mosaics which suggest ties and connections between the giant-sized and miniature stars who, like a collection of different DNA cells, make up the body of their host.

Alex Guofeng Cao
Decompose/Recompose: Resurrect
S T U X Gallery, New York
May 6, 2010 - May 29, 2010
 
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By LIZ SMITH
Published: May 21, 2010

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20100521Wowowow Art Review
Liz Smith: 'Glee' Hails Madonna Again Also in Our Gossip Girl's weekend dish: Spiderman will cast his web over Broadway … Liz recommends – 'The Godfather of Kathmandu.' You still have a chance to see the works of photographer Alex Guofeng Cao at the Stefan Stux Gallery, 530 West 25th Street. He’s there through May 29. This guy is really good. He did the photo of me that appeared on the cover of my memoir Natural Blonde. He has wonderful snaps of Marilyn Monroe as well as many types of other rare birds.
 
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Photo By DAVID SPRAGUE
Published: January 15, 2010


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20100116DailyNewsPaper Art Review
Caption: An attendee views photos by Alex Guofeng Cao at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium during the opening reception for photo l.a. 2010 Thursday, January 14, 2010. The exposition runs Friday and Saturday from 11-7 and Sunday from 11-6. More information below. photo l.a. 2010 LAÕs 19th ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHIC ART EXPOSITION TO BE COMPLEMENTED BY THREE DAYS OF ORIGINAL ARTS PROGRAMMING INCLUDING DAVID LACHAPELLE IN CONVERSATION January 14-17 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium (LOS ANGELES, Calif.) January 6, 2010 Ð The 19th Annual International Los Angeles Photographic Art Exposition, photo l.a. 2010, will take place January 14-17 at the Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. Created by Stephen Cohen, producer of the highly acclaimed art fairs artLA and photo Miami, photo san francisco and photo NY, photo l.a. will feature the finest in photographic artÑfrom the earliest 19th Century photographic experiments to contemporary photography and photo-based art. In addition, beginning January 15, photo l.a. 2010 will include three days of collecting seminars, public discussions and other programming created specifically to complement the exhibition, including David LaChapelle in conversation with Degen Pener. ÒLos Angeles is home to many artistsÑa major creative center in terms of the production of photography and photo-based art,Ó says Stephen Cohen, producer of photo l.a., owner of the Stephen Cohen gallery.
 
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Photo By BRANDON WISE
Published: January 18, 2010


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PHOTO PLAY

Visitors walk by the works of Alex Guofeng Cao and his 'Marilyn vs Monalisa' chromogenic print at the photo l.a. art exhibit on Saturday. The exhibit ran from Friday to Sunday and offered seminars and lectures by noted photographers.

 
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By LYNNE BRONSTEIN
Published: January 14, 2010


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20100114SantaMonicaMirror Art Review
The 19th Annual International Los Angeles Photographic Art Exposition, better known as Photo LA, landed at the Santa Monica Civic over the weekend of January 15-17, with a show that somehow seemed smaller than in recent memory. More than 30 galleries and art groups from around the world were exhibitors and the prevailing trends seemed to be black and white, celebrities, and occasional nudity.


Even larger were the chromogenic prints of Alex Guofeng Cao at Pan-American Projects (Miami). Cao’s technique creates pictures of celebrity faces from many small prints of other celebrity faces. On display were Princess Di wrought from tiny faces of Princess Grace, James Dean made from tiny Elvis faces, and Marilyn Monroe created out of tiny Mona Lisa faces.

 
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Published: May 1, 2010
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20100501SunTimesMedia Art Review
A preview of Artropolis 2010 at the Merchandise Mart, which runs April 30 through May 3. The show covers three floors of the Mart and features pieces from Art Chicago, NEXT and the Merchandise Mart International Antique Fair. People study the Photo Mosaics of artist Alex Guofeng Cao. Repetitive tiny images in graged shades compose the larger, recognizable image, but the larger photo is not composed of like images. The JFK is made nearly entirely of Jackie Kennedy images and also some of the Kennedy family.
 
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Published: July 8, 2010
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20100708contra Art Review
Legend by Alex Guofeng Cao is a series of large scale photographs made up of many miniature photos of various iconic celebrities. Born in China and raised in the States, this New York based photographer’s work takes well known analog images and creating a digital mosaic in large scale with small scale photos. Taking it a step further, the resulting large scale image is actually made up of small images of different connected celebrities. For example, Marylin Monroe is made up of JFK images, Obama is made up of Lincoln images, and so on. While strolling through the Lower East Side, we stumbled onto his studio just before he was closing, but he was gracious enough to allow us to take a peek and grab some snaps. More photos after the jump, hit his site for more detailed images of his works.
 
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Alex Guofeng Cao pays homage to pop culture's most famous icons in a very unique way. At first glance, Cao's series Decompose/Compose: Resurrect appears to simply be portraits of celebrities, such as Marilyn Monroe, Andy Warhol and Brigitte Bardot. Upon closer inspection, one can see that Cao's pieces are composed of small repetitive images. The arrays of miniscule visages used by Cao to form the larger portraits, are themselves iconic images. Cao's images are imposing and arresting to say the least.
 
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By DAN GROSSMAN
Published: Jun 2, 2010

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20100602Nuvo Art Review
Contrasts & Collusions: A View into the Methodology of Black and White: work by Alex Guofeng Cao and Joseph Piccillo Evan Lurie Gallery Four stars Alex Guofeng Cao's immense black and white portraits of Marilyn Monroe, Andy Warhol, and John F. Kennedy (among others) resemble traditional photographs from a distance. But then as you draw nearer, you notice that these photographs, like low-res computer images, seem to be pixilated. Drawing even closer to the image of JKF pointing with his right hand (while uttering the words "Ask not what your country can do for you...") you can make out thousands of photos of Marilyn Monroe that compose the larger image. The title of the work, "JFK vs. Marilyn" suggests an historical bond between these two iconic figures that cannot be broken. Cao is inspired by ancient Roman mosaics and the Egyptian pyramids—both examples of large-scale art composed of smaller building blocks. "Everybody sees something different" in these images, says this Chinese-born, New York-based artist. The canvases of painter Joseph Piccillo are also (largely) in shades of black and white and are as technically adept as Cao's images are conceptually brilliant. In "#5" (graphite and oil on canvas) you can just about see the racehorse leaping out of the canvas. Through July 15; 317-844-8460, www.evanluriegallery.com
 
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Published: December 19, 2009


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Art Miami's 20th Anniversary Edition Celebrates Strong Attendance and Sales

MIAMI, FL.- Art Miami, the longest running contemporary art fair in Miami and the anchor art fair for the city of Miami, reported outstanding results during Art Week Miami 2009, exceeding the expectations of many. More than 35,000 people visited the fair during the course of the week – an increase of 10% from last year.

“We were delighted to have a large turnout of serious, committed collectors, museum curators and others drawn by the exciting work that was exhibited at Art Miami this year. Once again, buyers responded to the Fair’s international mix of work and galleries. Sales were very strong,” Director Nick Korniloff commented.

Art Miami’s stellar 2009 run began on December 1st with a ribbon cutting and a 20th Anniversary Proclamation presentation by Miami City Commissioner Bruno Barreiro. A gala VIP reception, attended by 6,500 people, followed. At what Caldwell Snyder Gallery called “the best opening of any art fair,” museum curators rubbed elbows with artists including James Rosenquist and Frank Stella and with collectors from the United States, Canada, Europe, South America, and Asia—Steve Wynn, Marvin Ross Friedman, Marty Margulies, Jorge Perez, Pat and Larry Stewart, Mary and Frank Howard, Joyce Kan, Pearl Lam, Noel and Terry Neelands, John Ferin, Jeff Roth, Matthew Adell, and Naomi Campbell. Opening night proceeds and a percentage of sales from participating galleries benefited The Lotus House Women’s Shelter, netting nearly $9,000 for the program. In the two years of its involvement, Art Miami has raised more than $40,000 for the shelter, founded in 2006 by Constance Collins Margulies and the Sundari Foundation. The opening night event was crowned by a multimedia performance by the Black Estate presented by Claire Oliver Gallery.

In photography, ChinaSquare Gallery’s Alex Guofeng Cao’s images of Bruni vs Sarkozy, JFK vs Marilyn and Obama vs Lincoln sold out; The Miami Herald did a cover story about this unusual work. Four David Drebin “Champion” photographs sold at Contessa Gallery – two for $20,000 and two for $25,000; a Starn Twins image for $40,000 at HackelBury Fine Art Ltd; a Julia Fullerton-Batten photograph for $17,000 at Jenkins Johnson Gallery; a Deborah Oropallo image for $16,000 at Turner Carroll Gallery; and a Martin Schoeller image of Clint Eastwood for $10,000 at Hasted Hunt Kraeutler.

 
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Published: May 27, 2010
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20100527Metromix Art Review
At first glance, the 6-by-9-foot photograph of James Dean looks blurry or pixilated. Look closer, though, and you’ll see the picture is actually is made of thousands of tiny images of Elvis Presley. The work was created by New York artist Alex Guofeng Cao, who assembles portraits of iconic Americans using thousands of minute images of a contrasting personality (like an Abraham Lincoln made up of tiny President Obama photos). Cao’s images will share space with large-scale, charcoal-based works by Joseph Piccillo.
 
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Published: May 9, 2010
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20100509NYartbeat Art Review
Confronting the viewer with a large-scale, imposing photographic image, one that is on the face of it, very familiar—a well-known celebrity photo—Alex Guofeng Cao connects the circuits of historical meaning by breaking down this memorable face into a grid of thousands of copies of a smaller, related image. Marilyn Monroe decomposes into strings of repeated pictures of JFK, or of the Mona Lisa; Pamela Anderson dissolves into tiny reproductions of Courbet’s L’Origine du Monde; Andy Warhol emerges from a sea of Mao’s. These finely produced photographic mosaics, inspired by Cao’s interest in similarly pieced works from Greek and Roman antiquity, leverage the new technical possibilities of digital images, making the pixel itself a new, self-conscious carrier of meaning itself, and not merely a structural support for its expression. Cao takes this a step farther, replacing some of the thousands of embedded images in each work with other pictures (requiring closer investigation in order to find them), casting deeper reflection on the historical or cultural field of meaning already generated by the two primary interwoven images. In JFK vs. Marilyn, for example, the ‘pixels’ numbered 1962 and 1963 have been replaced by an image of a candle and of a rifle. The artist renders what Barthes formulated as the photograph’s intransigent presence as what-has-been porous to the narratives of history and the process of representation itself. The process of decomposing the original image allows it to re-emerge with a new lease on life; to be resurrected, as it were.
 
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by KARIN
Published: December 15, 2009


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20091215KarinRaoul Art Review

Alex Guofeng Cao is genius! Taking images from Icons and layering it with another symbolic image underneath. Look closely and you will see…

At ChinaSquare Gallery in Art Miami, pixelated images by Alex Guofeng Cao appear to be huge photographs. But look closely and you’ll see that the “pixels” are really tiny photographic images.

The portrait of President Barack Obama is made up of photos of President Abraham Lincoln; Marilyn Monroe is composed of tiny images of JFK; JFK of tiny images of Monroe. Sold opening night: An image of Carla Bruni, made up of tiny images of French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

This pixelated image of Brad Pitt has his beautiful partner Angelina Jolie discretely underneath. Once I saw got to see at close range, I instantly fell in love with the concept and the image over all!

 
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Published: December 10, 2009
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20091210TheWeek Art Review
Alex Guofeng Cao uses digital techniques to create composites of famous lovers—a Marilyn Monroe made from John F. Kennedys, for example, and an Angelina Jolie put together from Brad Pitts.
 
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Published: May 26, 2010

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20100526ArtHag Art Review
~Alex Guofeng Cao, Decompose/Recompose: Resurrect at Stux: Alex Guofeng Cao's first solo exhibit in NYC, Decompose/Recompose: Resurrect, at Stefan Stux Gallery consists of large-scale black-and-white images of celebrities composed with grids of thousands of copies of teeny-tiny images of a related celeb. For instance, a large image of "Marilyn Monroe decomposes into strings of repeated pictures of JFK, or of the Mona Lisa" (from the press release) and a large Andy Warhol portrait breaks down into multiple copies of his silk-screen portrait of Mao Zedong and vice versa. "These finely produced photographic mosaics, inspired by Cao's interest in similarly pieced works from Greek and Roman antiquity" are reminiscent of Chuck Close's photorealist grid paintings and make "the pixel itself a new, self-conscious carrier of meaning itself, and not merely a structural support for its expression." As the shows press release explains, "The process of decomposing the original image allows it to re-emerge with a new lease on life; to be resurrected..." Learn more at Stuxgallery.com. Through May 29th.
 
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Published: April 29, 2010
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20100430publicinChicago Art Review
At a glance, these images are of popular cultural icons.. Upon closer inspection, one can notice that these are made of other tiny images.. These are imposing images.. and a closer look makes them even mre interesting.. Like the image of Marilyn Monroe is made up of images of Mona Lisa..
 
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Published: December 4, 2009

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20091218psfk Art Review

Art Basel Miami: Alex Guofeng Cao’s
Small Image/Big Image Photographs

You think you’re looking at yet another image of Barack Obama, but then you step closer to realize this black and white portrait photograph is made up of hundreds of tiny photographic images of Abraham Lincoln. Alex Guofeng Cao is a Chinese artist based in New York who grabs the most famous of celebrity icons and pairs them with similar icons. He provides a visual reminder of the tensions which exist between the relationships and the contribution they have made to social discourse; Brad Pitt is made up of Angelina Jolie, Princess Diana of Grace Kelly, JFK of Marilyn Monroe and Marilyn Monroe made up of JFK. All of these figures have played an almost God-like role to their audiences, each of them unreachable stars in their own rights who have made indelible marks in the communities they derive from. By encouraging this interplay between two differing yet interchangeable icons, Alex Guofeng Cao adds even more mystery to the impact of each of their reputations on popular culture. The image of Carla Bruni, made up of tiny images of French President Nicolas Sarkozy, sold on opening night at Photo Miami during Art Basel Miami 2009.
 
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By Jillian Lobato
December 4th, 2009

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HauteLiving120509 Art Review
Hautest Art Basel Events Not To Be Missed

Art Basel Miami Beach is for any and every one. With all the craze in Miami of hipsters and socialites skipping from one Art Basel party to the next and scoping out all of the beach’s beautiful galleries, it’s only fair that we tell you what our favorites are…the ones you shouldn’t miss.

What: ChinaSquare Gallery
Where: Art Miami
Why: Pixelated images by Alex Guofeng Cao appear to be huge photographs. But look closely and you’ll see that the pixels are actually tiny photographic images, like the portrait of President Barack Obama made up of photos of President Abraham Lincoln; Marilyn Monroe is composed of tiny images of JFK; JFK of tiny images of Monroe.

 
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Published: December 9, 2009


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20091203NYCinFocus Art Review

A Changing Landscape: Galleries of the Lower East Side

When April Vollmer first moved to the Lower East Side in 1986, she took weekend walks uptown to Soho, where a growing art scene attracted a number of galleries. At the time the only kind of gallery that existed in Vollmer’s neighborhood was the shooting type—places where drug addicts gathered to buy and inject drugs. Vollmer remembers syringes lying on the streets and times when she and her partner found drug addicts outside their apartment.

“It’s not just a homogeneous world,” but one that is “very diversified in an edgy way,” said Jen Davis, director of CSquare Gallery, which opened on Allen Street two months ago. CSquare Gallery’s upcoming exhibit will feature window-sized pixilated prints of celebrity faces. Next door to the gallery is Congee Village, a popular Cantonese restaurant. Across the street, Chinese stores sell floor supplies, tires and electronic gadgets. Just a few blocks away, lively restaurants lure young professionals in the neighborhood with neon BYOB signs.

Visitors who have come to the Lower East Side for its restaurants and bars have often stumbled upon the neighborhood’s art scene. A stop at a nearby gallery often becomes an unplanned part of the post-meal walk.

 
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Published: April 10, 2010
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20100410Tagarts Art Review
Alex Guofeng Cao's most recent photographic work is a series of pop culture icons. His main characters are easily identifiable; however upon closer inspection, one can see that these celebrities are composed of tiny repetitive images of another well-known icon. The arrangment of miniature faces that form the larger portraits are specifically paired to create a unique dialogue based on their histories and backgrounds. As one looks closer at the small images and the differing details in each, the viewer will find carefully hidden codes and clues that Cao has inserted in strategic locations as a reminder of the events and situations in which these characters were involved in history.
 
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Published: May 6, 2010
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20100506AsianNY Art Review
Stefan Stux Gallery is pleased to present “Decompose/Recompose: Resurrect,” the first one-person exhibition in New York of recent photo works by Alex Guofeng Cao. Confronting the viewer with a large-scale, imposing photographic image, one that is on the face of it, very familiar—a well-known celebrity photo—Alex Guofeng Cao connects the circuits of historical meaning by breaking down this memorable face into a grid of thousands of copies of a smaller, related image. Marilyn Monroe decomposes into strings of repeated pictures of JFK, or of the Mona Lisa; Pamela Anderson dissolves into tiny reproductions of Courbet’s L’Origine du Monde; Andy Warhol emerges from a sea of Mao’s. These finely produced photographic mosaics, inspired by Cao’s interest in similarly pieced works from Greek and Roman antiquity, leverage the new technical possibilities of digital images, making the pixel itself a new, self-conscious carrier of meaning itself, and not merely a structural support for its expression. Cao takes this a step farther, replacing some of the thousands of embedded images in each work with other pictures (requiring closer investigation in order to find them), casting deeper reflection on the historical or cultural field of meaning already generated by the two primary interwoven images. In JFK vs. Marilyn, for example, the ‘pixels’ numbered 1962 and 1963 have been replaced by an image of a candle and of a rifle. The artist renders what Barthes formulated as the photograph’s intransigent presence as what-has-been porous to the narratives of history and the process of representation itself. The process of decomposing the original image allows it to re-emerge with a new lease on life; to be resurrected, as it were. Alex Guofeng Cao was born in China, and currently lives and works in New York.
 
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Published: April 5, 2010
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20100405kgiambrone Art Review
Experimented with various techniques in photography but especially loved working with black and white. He enjoyed the gradations between very dark and very light shades. In his most recent work he creates works about popular icons. He makes a mosaic with smaller images to construct the full image which entails a meaning or story.
 
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Published: May 14, 2010
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20100514According2G Art Review
At first glance, when you walk into the Stefan Stux Gallery in New York and see the exhibit Decompose / Recompose: Resurrect by Alex Guofeng Cao, you will view larger than life photos of some of the most recognizable icons in the world such as Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, Gandhi, Mother Teresa, Madonna, Marilyn Monroe and Pamela Anderson, your first thought is “I know that picture. Why is this in a gallery?” Upon further examination, Chinese artist Alex Guofeng Cao’s photo mosaics consist of hundreds of tiny images of similar photographs. For example, the next two photos are closeups of the Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt pictures. I loved this exhibit! Decompose / Recompose: Resurrect is now showing at the Stefan Stux Gallery in Chelsea through May 29, 2010. See a really famous image of Pamela Anderson and what comprises the photo after the jump. Please note, the Pamela Anderson photo contains nudity, so if you are offended by boobies, don’t say I didn’t warn ya. Pamela Anderson is made up of reproductions of Courbet’s L’Origine du Monde. Really cool stuff! Check it out.
 
LA PHOTO
Photo By TED SOQUIL
Published: January 15, 2010


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20100115LAphotoblog Art Review
Detail of Alex Guofeng Cao's "Marilyn vs. Mona Lisa" print
 
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Published: May 6, 2010
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20100506flickr Art Review
Stux Gallery in Chelsea, NYC. Pixelated images by Alex Guofeng Cao appear to be huge photographs. But look closely and you'll see that the "pixels" are really tiny photographic images. These photographs are amazing!!!!!!!!
 
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By JENNIFER LIMA
Published: January 17, 2010


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20100117Examiner Art Review
One art installation that seemed to get a lot of attention all day was a three piece series of chromogenic prints displayed by Pan American Art Projects. The installation, by artist Alex Guofeng Cao, consisted of a James Dean photo made entirely of Elvis images, a Princess Diana photo made of Princess Grace images and the ever so popular 9ft Marilyn Monroe photo made of the Mona Lisa. The Monroe, getting more praise it seemed than any, had a beauty about it that just drew people in. By the end of the day, I lost count of how many people posed for a photo next to it.

I almost forget where I was, until I saw an older man with this washed-out rock star kind of look admiring the chromogenic installation with his much younger girlfriend. To me, he seemed to be leaning into the photograph a bit too close when he suddenly stepped back, did a quick over the shoulder look around and pulled out a pair of glasses from his hip leather jacket. He quickly put them on, looked at the artwork once again, at a normal distance, and slipped them back into hiding. Reminding me once again that this was so Hollywood.

 
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Published: December 7, 2009

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200912007ArtMusicFilmWhatev Art Review

Art Basel is over, may i please have my life back?

This year's Art Basel Miami Beach did not go nearly as planned. I took a day off early and only made it to half the fairs and events I had planned to attend. However I did go three days (Wed., Fri., and Sat.) and saw some great stuff. No regrets!

Celebrity portraits created using smaller images of other celebrities including Jackson vs Monroe by Alex Guofeng Cao. Here you can see how the image of MJ was created as well as how it was sold four times, all before the weekend! Biggest Theme: Celebrities Including, but not limited to, Marilyn Monroe, Princess Diana, JFK, and of course the King of Pop (and Basel '09) himself, Michael Jackson. Photographs, portraits, and sculptures of these people were everywhere! I think this was due in large part to the exceeding desperation of most galleries to sell art and what sells more than celebrities? Dead celebrities.
 
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Published: December 4, 2009
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MiamiHeraldAlexGuofengCaoES Art Review
No hay quer un conocedor ni un experto en historia del arte para disfrutar de esa invasión artística anual conocida como Art Basel Miami Beach y sus 19 ferias artísticas satélites.

Para decirlo simplemente, es un verdadero paraíso artístico.



No será nada nuevo pero, en su mejor forma, el arte nos inspira, provoca, educa y sorprende con enorme fuerza. Así que póngase unos zapatos cómodos y vaya a disfrutar de las imágenes.



He aquí una selección hecha por personal del Herald sobre los trabajos indispensables, que lo ayudarán a navegar el exceso de oferrtas y la escasez de tiempo.



En la ChinaSquare Gallery en Art Miami, pixeladas imágenes de Alex Guofeng Cao parecen enormes fotografías. Pero, cuando se miran de cerca, se ve que los "pixeles'' son, en realidad, diminutas fotografías. El retrato del presidente Obama está hecho de fotos de Abraham Lincoln; Marilyn Monroe esta compuestas por minúsculas fotos de JFK y JFK está hecho de minúsculas imágenes de Monroe. En la noche inaugural se vendió una imagen de Carla Bruni, compuesta de diminutas imágenes del presidente de Francia Nicolás Sakozy.

 
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December 3, 2009
Door onze redacteur Sandra Smallenburg
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NRC120509 Art Review
Michael Jackson muze op kunstbeurs Miami



Miami, 3 dec. Tijdens zijn leven was Michael Jackson al een geliefd onderwerp voor beeldend kunstenaars – denk aan Andy Warhol of Jeff Koons – maar nu hij dood is, is hij pas echt een muze geworden. Op de gisteravond geopende kunstbeurs Art Basel Miami Beach duikt de popster overal op.



Voor 155.000 dollar kunnen Jackson-fans investeren in een drieluik van modefotograaf David LaChapelle, die de zanger onder meer als aartsengel en dode Christusfiguur portretteerde. Tijdens de opening bleek de stand van galerie Shafrazi een populaire fotospot, waar het deftige kunstpubliek zich gretig met de King of Pop lieten vereeuwigen.



Een andere trekpleister is een metershoog ruiterportret van de Amerikaan Kehinde Wiley, te koop bij Deitch Projects voor 175.000 dollar. Jackson zit daarop hoog te paard, in een pose die duidelijk ontleend is aan Rubens’ beroemde portret van Philip II uit het Prado. Wiley’s galeriehoudster vertelt trots dat de popster zelf contact had gezocht met de schilder. „Hij had Wiley’s werk in 2007 gezien in het Brooklyn Museum in New York en wilde graag door hem worden geportretteerd. Wiley stelde voor om hem in de stijl van een oude meester te schilderen en stuurde hem diverse kunsthistorische afbeeldingen op. Jackson bleek behoorlijk wat van schilderkunst af te weten.” Een Japanse verzamelaar toont zich hevig teleurgesteld als blijkt dat het werk al gereserveerd is. „Kan hij er niet nog eentje maken?” probeert hij nog. „En dan liefst iets kleiner.”



Nog wel te koop is het Jacksonportret dat de Chinese kunstenar Alex Guofeng Cao toont op de veel kleinere beurs Art Miami. Bij nadere beschouwing blijkt dat deze ode, te zien bij de China Square Gallery, is opgebouwd uit allemaal piepkleine zwart-witfotootjes van Marilyn Monroe. „Michael en Marilyn zijn beiden veel te vroeg aan een overdosis drugs overleden”, verklaart de maker. „En beiden deden zich altijd heel vrolijk voor, terwijl ze zich van binnen vaak triest voelden.” Met een prijs van 4.500 dollar zal het niet lang duren of ook dit werk hangt binnenkort boven het bed van een fan.